Curriculum Guide

Welcome to Hilton Head Prep Lower School, a program for Junior Kindergarten through fifth grade, where children foster a love of learning in a safe and developmentally appropriate environment.

Hilton Head Prep maintains a rigorous and challenging curriculum for all its students, while recognizing that students come to the school with different learning needs. We acknowledge and value the difference in our students. Teachers work to meet the needs of individuals through whole group, small group or individualized instruction.

Hilton Head Prep is a community based on a partnership between students, parents, teachers and administration. The faculty is composed of loving and caring individuals who model learning each day. Teachers support the students academically, socially and emotionally.

The Lower School program is based on educational best practices rooted in child development research. The curriculum fosters critical thinking, creativity, teamwork, communication and technology. At the core of the curriculum is language arts, leveled reading, math, science and social studies, complemented by art, physical education, life skills, strings, Spanish, computer and library. The beauty of the Sea Pines Nature Preserve enriches the science program. Along with The Preserve and the partnership with the Coastal Discovery Museum, both allow the students to experience marine and environmental science. Smartboards, document cameras and an iPad cart support integration of technology in each classroom. Students in third, fourth and fifth are allowed to bring their own device.

Our close-knit classroom community in the lower grades is built through the Responsive Classroom approach. Lower School seeks to promote the development of a strong moral compass by living by the 3 R's - respect for self, respect for others and respect for community.

It is a pleasure and privilege to work with so many that take pride in their roles as Hilton Head Prep students, families, faculty and staff. We look forward to sharing more of our school with you and invite you to see for yourselves the unique and exciting educational journey that occurs within Hilton Head Prep Lower School.

Darcy Devrnja
Head of Lower School
JK-5

Junior Kindergarten

Language Arts JK

The language arts curriculum uses a multi-sensory approach to teaching listening, speaking, pre-reading, and pre-writing skills. Our language arts curriculum is based on South Carolina’s Early Learning Standards combined with the following Principles of Learning and Objectives in mind.
Principles of Learning include the idea that children have had varied experiences by the ages of 3-5, children readily engage in highly motivating instructional material, skills will be practiced and reinforced in order to be mastered and retained, and young children learn best through a "hands-on" play based approach. Research supports the effectiveness of both child-centered, embedded instruction and direct, systematic instruction. Our literacy-based program offers both direct and indirect instruction to teach children as they grow in all areas of language development. Pre-reading activities include rhyming, basic vocabulary for spatial relations, categorizing, sequencing, recalling details, and following oral directions. In addition, children enjoy a variety of language-building experiences throughout the classroom. They learn to use complete sentences of increasing length in conversation, dictate stories as a pre-writing skill, associate beginning and ending sounds, and identify and produce rhyming words. Students move developmentally through the pre-writing stages at their own pace.

The alphabet is introduced in its entirety (A-Z). Letter sounds are taught in isolation, through use of word families, language experiences and by grouping letters/sounds where differentiating can improve mastery. Songs, stories, rhymes, poems, outdoor exploration, manipulatives and other activities related to the curriculum are integrated into the program. Thematic units are the focus for an interdisciplinary approach to learning. Children are exposed to a variety of literature including both fiction and non-fiction. Critical thinking skills are enhanced when higher-level questions are posed through prior learning, prediction, shared readings and reflection. Dramatization is used when teaching self-expression and sequencing. Students connect information and events in books to real-life experiences. Children recognize that letters form words and sentences are composed of separate words. Through oral reading activities, children improve their ability to become increasingly familiar with the structure of stories: characters, events, and sequencing.

Math JK

Math skills are taught through a variety of methods. The Junior Kindergarten math curriculum is based on the Sadlier-Oxford scope and sequence and continues throughout the Lower School. Concrete materials and sequential activities are carefully designed with the following philosophy:

Young children experience number development best by manipulating concrete materials and interacting with their environment.
In order to have a solid grasp of number development, children must manipulate materials and verbalize the results.
Experiences and learning styles of children vary considerably and therefore activities are designed to differentiate for individual abilities.
Children are encouraged to think and engage in tasks that motivate as well as challenge.

Junior Kindergarten skill development includes: free exploration, sorting, patterning, graphing, number concepts, geometry, problem solving, time and measurement. The skills are taught and revisited as a spiral approach. Additional thematic activities are designed to complement the curriculum and reinforce creative problem solving. Math games are an integral part of reinforcing concepts in a highly motivating environment.

Social Studies JK

The primary goal of the Junior Kindergarten social studies program is to help each child recognize his/her uniqueness and identity. The program focuses on how we are a part of the world: family, school, community, environment, and how we interact with other living creatures. The children are introduced to the seven continents. They will identify how people around the world are alike and different. Children develop a respect for others by recognizing each person’s uniqueness and an appreciation of their culture and ethnicity. A thematic approach is used in designing social studies units and hands on activities. Children have opportunities to role-play and use a variety of mediums and materials related to each theme.

Units of Study

Integrated learning units coordinate academic subject areas around a common theme. Our effective units align with our academic content standards. It follows from students' needs and interests and inspires students to achieve academic success.

Information Literacy JK

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Kindergarten

Language Arts K

Through an integrated approach, literacy solutions Reading Wonders build all learners – both striving and struggling – into stronger readers and writers.

Math K

The Sadlier-Oxford math program offers step-by-step instruction that leads to conceptual understanding. It includes frequent, sequenced practice that develops fluency with skills. Activities support the development of higher-order thinking skills and strong development of problem-solving competence. The kindergarten mathematics curriculum introduces young learners to the following:

  • Sorting
  • Geometry and patterns
  • Positions
  • Numbers 0-10
  • Numbers to 31
  • Tables, Graphs, and Fractions
  • Addition Readiness
  • Subtraction Readiness
  • Money
  • Time
  • Geometry and Patterns
  • Numbers to 100


Science K

Our science program engages the innate curiosity that kindergartners bring with them to school. Lessons provide opportunities for children to work together to investigate and then communicate their ideas and discoveries to teachers and peers. The introduction to the science inquiry skills will provide a firm foundation for children’s continued work in science. Areas of study include: Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Physical Science.

Social Studies K

Social Studies curriculum provides students with an opportunity to become informed, productive citizens. This requires an understanding of history, geography, economic responsibilities, participation in civic affairs, and the skills needed for personal decision-making. Social studies instruction in the kindergarten classroom encompasses: Maps, Rules and Authority Figures, American Democracy, and Past vs. Present.

Spanish K

Spanish in Kindergarten will focus on interpersonal communication, therefore students will be speaking and listening during their Spanish classes. The main goals are to develop correct pronunciation and begin to gain comfort in simple conversations. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more. You can expect your child(ren) to come home and want to practice with you, so get ready to learn some Spanish at home too!

Information Literacy K

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

First Grade

Language Arts 1

Through an integrated approach, addressing both striving and struggling students, this course will develop students into stronger readers and writers. McGraw Hill's Reading Wonders curriculum is used for this content area.

Math 1

In First Grade instructional time focuses on four critical areas:

  1. Developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies fro addition and subtraction within 20
  2. Developing understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones
  3. Developing understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units
  4. Reasoning about attributes of, and composing and decomposing geometric shapes


Science 1

First Grade explores the world around them. Students begin to learn about scientific inquiry and method, covering the following areas: Life Science, Earth and Space Science and Physical Science.

Social Studies 1

The focus for social studies in the first grade is the family in America and in other countries around the world. Students explore their own culture and then expand their study to other lands and peoples to learn about the ways that those families live and work. They also learn about the connections between families and the environment and explore the concept of government, including the role of government in making and enforcing laws.

Spanish 1

Spanish 1 will focus on interpersonal communication this year, therefore students will be speaking and listening during their Spanish classes. The main goals are to develop correct pronunciation and begin to gain comfort in simple conversations. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more.

Music 1

  • Students sing independently, on pitch and in rhythm, with appropriate timbre, diction, and posture, and maintain a steady tempo
  • Students sing expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation
  • Students sing from memory songs representing genres and styles.
  • Students sing partner songs, and rounds
  • Students sing in groups, blending vocal timbres, matching dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a conductor.


Information Literacy 1

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Second Grade

Language Arts 2

The following building blocks of Language Arts are integrated across second grade using the McGraw-Hill Wonders Reading/Language Arts program. This curriculum reflects best practices in building a strong reading foundation. During reading, students use text evidence to support their answers in both group discussions and during their differentiated reading group time. Vocabulary development is built into each unit as students apply their knowledge of word meaning to reading selections. Emphasis is placed on strengthening comprehension strategies by: Visualizing, Predicting, Questioning and Summarizing. Grammar is an integral part of this program that includes: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and the capitalization and punctuation of sentences. Phonics and spelling skills are linked to accelerate students’ mastery of the phonics patterns in reading. Spelling skills act as a link between students’ oral vocabulary and their writing ability. The writing curriculum focuses on learning and implementing each step in the Writing Process as students advance their writing proficiency. Second graders develop public speaking skills by sharing their “published” writing pieces with classmates.

Math 2

In second grade the Sadlier-Oxford Progress in Mathematics program cultivates conceptual understanding and procedural fluency in fundamental mathematical concepts. New concepts are introduced using manipulative materials and the Smartboard. Key emphasis is placed on the development of critical thinking skills. In addition to the core textbook, students are provided differentiated instruction using classroom iPads and the IXL online math program. Problem solving strategies are also developed by completing individualized “Think Tank” challenge tasks that motivate students to learn and flourish.

Science 2

In Life Science, second graders investigate the Classes of Invertebrates and their characteristics. This unit includes a field trip to the Butterfly House and Dragonfly pond at Coastal Discovery Museum. Students also complete a research project on their favorite invertebrate and share their report with classmates. Next, students study the Classes of Vertebrates and complete a hands-on project on the life cycle of a frog. Then, second graders summarize the interdependence between animals and plants as sources of food during our unit on Food Chains. In Earth Science, students complete a study of weather throughout the seasons using weather symbols and compared and contrast weather in different regions of the United States. As part of the Physical Science curriculum students recognize and compare properties of the states of matter-solid, liquid and gas and complete a science experiment demonstrating the water cycle. Students also demonstrate an understanding of force and motion by experimenting with Matter and Magnets. Throughout the year second graders will participate in Science Inquiry investigations by conducting science experiments following the steps of the Scientific Method: observing, asking questions, conducting research, making hypothesis, testing and experimenting, analyzing data, drawing conclusions. This information is recorded on a science “lab report” and shared with peers. Field trips and our Nancy Bunting Enrichment Experience programs, conducted by education specialists at the Coastal Discovery Museum, enrich our science curriculum.

Social Studies 2

The focus for Social Studies in grade two is on communities and the diverse cultures that have contributed to the nation’s heritage. Students will travel through five geographic regions of the United States studying and recording highlights of each state on individual maps using a map key. This study will include an interactive tour of major National Parks where students become Junior Rangers and bring learning to life. Using the novel Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder students will compare and contrast the lives of pioneers to our lives today.

Second graders will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the branches of government that allow citizens to participate in the democratic process.

After learning the continents students enthusiastically participate in Current Events, sharing local or global topics. This weekly activity fosters an understanding of the interrelationship of people and cultures in our “global neighborhood”.

The Second Grade Studies Weekly is a newsletter parallels our social studies standards.

Spanish 2

Spanish 2 will focus on interpersonal communication this year, so students will be speaking and listening during their Spanish classes. The main goals for this year are to develop correct pronunciation and begin to gain comfort in simple conversations. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more.

Information Literacy 2

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Third Grade

Language Arts 3

The McGraw-Hill reading program helps develop fluency in reading. It will also address students’ attention to main ideas and details. The skills developed will help students draw conclusions, recognize cause and effect, and determine the author’s point of view. The following will be assessed in this subject: reading comprehension, vocabulary, and skills learned for the story.

Science 3

Science instruction in fourth grade allows students to interact and connect to science, making learning more personal. The program nurtures the more inquisitive side of students, using the ABCs (Activity, Before Concept) model of inquiry. Students engage with and explore science concepts before reading content. The course aims to develop scientific literacy so that they better understand the world we live in. In third grade, students learn about science by applying reading skills to science texts and by practicing mathematical concepts. Science instruction uses the backwards thinking instructional model as a pedagogical framework in order to enhance student achievement. Students deepen their learning about scientific concepts through the big question and essential questions format. Finally students encounter scaffolded questions which encourage students to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to apply understandings from the inquiry activities. Specific areas of inquiry in third grade include: Science, Technology and Technology (STEM): The Nature of Science; Technology and the Designe Process.

Life Science : Plants; Living Things; Ecosystems

Earth Science: Earth and Water; Earth and Our Universe

Physical Science: Matter; Energy and Its Forms; Forces and Motion

Spanish 3

This is going to be an exciting year for 3rd Grade Spanish! We will focus on interpersonal communication this year, so students will be speaking and listening during their Spanish classes. Additionally, we will begin to read and write in Spanish as the year progresses. The main goals for this year are to develop correct pronunciation and begin to gain comfort in simple conversations. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more! You can expect your child(ren) to come home and want to practice with you, so get ready to learn some Spanish at home too!

Information Literacy 3

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Fourth Grade

Language Arts 4

This course will be to better the students understanding of concepts taught in language arts. Students will be assessed on their knowledge in the following concepts: spelling, grammar, writing, reading, and phonics. From there students will engage in activities that better their understanding of different skills covered in each of the five concept areas. Students will take the skills and apply them to their reading and knowledge of comprehension.

Our reading series is McGraw Hill Wonders program. Each week contains multiple reading comprehension strategies, phonics, grammar, vocabulary, and a writing prompt. The entire week is connected by an essential question that links them all together. There are six weeks to each unit. With the sixth week being the unit test. Each individual week ends with a reading comprehension quiz made up of multiple choice questions and a writing response. As needed, the weeks may need to be extended due to student performance. The curriculum is supplemented with grade level appropriate novel studies throughout the year.

Math 4

This course will cultivate conceptual understanding and fluency in procedure and provide instruction in fundamental mathematical concepts, such as place value and the relationship of operations. Emphasis will be placed on the development of higher order thinking skills and fluency with mathematical vocabulary. Students will be encouraged to reflect on mathematical processes and patterns as well as their own ideas.

Science 4

Science instruction in fourth grade allows students to interact and connect to science, making learning more personal. The program nurtures the more inquisitive side of students, using the ABCs (Activity, Before Concept) model of inquiry. Students engage with and explore science concepts before reading content. The course aims to develop scientific literacy so that they better understand the world we live in. In fourth grade, students learn about science by applying reading skills to science texts and by practicing mathematical concepts. Science instruction uses the backwards thinking instructional model as a pedagogical framework in order to enhance student achievement. Students deepen their learning about scientific concepts through the big question and essential questions format. Finally students encounter scaffolded questions which encourage students to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to apply understandings from the inquiry activities. Specific areas of inquiry in fourth grade include: Science, Technology and Technology (STEM): The Nature of Science; Technology and Design

Life Science : Plants and Animals; Ecosystems

Earth Science: Earth’s Resources; Earth and Space

Physical Science: Matter; Energy and Heat; Electricity and Magnetism; Motion

Social Studies 4

This course focuses on Ancient America through Reconstruction. The first six weeks focus on Geography and New World Exploration followed by Colonization and the Declaration on Independence. We then move onto the American Revolution through the War of 1812 followed by Westward Expansion to Reconstruction.

We follow Studies Weekly newspapers that correlate with the South Carolina standards. We have a newspaper that the children read along with online primary sources that can be viewed by the students.

Spanish 4

Spanish 4 will focus on the three modes of communication this year: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. Students will be speaking, listening, reading and writing during their Spanish classes. The main goals are to further develop correct pronunciation, begin to gain more comfort in simple conversations, and develop a love for learning Spanish. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more.

Information Literacy 4

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Fifth Grade

Language Arts 5

This course will be to better the students understanding of concepts taught in language arts. Students will be assessed on their knowledge in the following concepts: spelling, grammar, writing, reading, and phonics. From there students will engage in activities that better their understanding of different skills covered in each of the five concept areas. Students will take the skills and apply them to their reading and knowledge of comprehension.

Our reading series is McGraw Hill Wonders program. Each week contains multiple reading comprehension strategies, phonics, grammar, vocabulary, and a writing prompt. The entire week is connected by an essential question that links them all together. There are six weeks to each unit. With the sixth week being the unit test. Each individual week ends with a reading comprehension quiz made up of multiple choice questions and a writing response. As needed, the weeks may need to be extended due to student performance. The curriculum is supplemented with grade level appropriate novel studies throughout the year.

Math 5

The objective of this course is to develop students' higher order thinking and provide instruction in fundamental mathematical concepts, such as place value and the relationship of operations, and in skills such as algorithms and data analysis. Attention will be focused on helping students become fluent in mathematical vocabulary. They will be encouraged to reflect on mathematical processes and patterns.

Science 5

Science instruction in fifth grade allows students to interact and connect to science, making learning more personal. The program nurtures the more inquisitive side of students, using the ABCs (Activity, Before Concept) model of inquiry. Students engage with and explore science concepts before reading content. The course aims to develop scientific literacy so that they better understand the world we live in. In fifth grade, students learn about science by applying reading skills to science texts and by practicing mathematical concepts. Science instruction uses the backwards thinking instructional model as a pedagogical framework in order to enhance student achievement. Students deepen their learning about scientific concepts through the big question and essential questions format. Finally students encounter scaffolded questions which encourage students to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to apply understandings from the inquiry activities. Specific areas of inquiry in fifth grade include: Science, Technology and Technology (STEM): Inquiry and Technology; Design and Function

Life Science : Classifying Organisms; Growth and Survival; Human Body Systems; Ecosystems

Earth Science: The Water Cycle and Weather; Earth’s Surface; Earth and Space

Physical Science: Matter and Its Properties; Forces; Changing Forms of Energy

Spanish 5

Spanish 5 will focus on the three modes of communication- interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. Students will be speaking, listening, reading and writing during their Spanish classes. The main goals are to further develop correct pronunciation, to gain comfort in communicating, and to prepare for middle school Spanish. Some of our activities will include: singing, storytelling, listening to and watching Spanish media, short skits and/or plays, art projects and more.

Information Literacy 5

Course Description:

A cross-disciplinary course designed to teach students how to become effective and ethical users and creators of information and capable, interested readers of literature. Students learn to appropriately identify, locate, access, analyze and create information in a variety of formats and gain exposure and access to a wide variety of literature selected for their age, interests, and academic pursuits.

Principles:

The Information Literacy Program at the KNS Media Center holds to the Common Beliefs about the value, importance, and necessity of school library media center programs as articulated in the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st - Century Learning (2007 American Library Association). These beliefs direct and frame instructional and operational activities designed to insure that students become competent readers, effective users of information, capable operators of technologies, and creative communicators of their own learning. Information Literacy classes are offered to Lower School students weekly and Middle and Upper School students when requested by their subject area instructors.

Common Beliefs:

Combined these elements build a learner who can thrive in a complex information environment.

  1. Reading is a window to the world. Reading is a foundational skill for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment.
  2. The degree to which students can read and understand text in all formats (e.g. picture, video, print) and all contexts is a key indicator of success in school and in life.
  3. As a lifelong learning skill, reading goes beyond decoding and comprehension to interpretation and development of new understandings.
  4. Inquiry provides a framework for learning. To become independent learners, students must gain not only specific inquiry skills but be taught in ways to develop the disposition to use those skills responsibly and with self-assessment strategies. Key will be teaching students to seek diverse perspectives, gather and use information ethically, and to use social tools safely and respectfully.
  5. Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs and students need to develop information skills that will enable them to use technology as an important tool for learning.
  6. All children deserve equitable access to books and reading, to information in its many forms and formats, and to information technology in an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
  7. The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
  8. The amount of information available to learners necessitates that each individual acquires the skills to select, evaluate, and use information appropriately and effectively.
  9. Learning has a social context and is enhanced by opportunities to share and learn with others. The school library media program helps students develop skills in sharing knowledge and learning with others, both in face-to-face situations and through technology.

Specials

Foreign Language Department Overview

Technology Department Overview

Music Overview

Art Department Overview

Life Skills Overview

Lower School Life Skills class is taught by the school counselor every other week in Kindergarten through Fifth Grade. It is intended to enhance the family’s role and help foster interpersonal and social skills that are necessary for success in school and life. The objectives are to reinforce the monthly character values, help students to make positive choices, take responsibility for their actions, and develop positive self-esteem. Lessons are age-appropriate consisting of stories, class discussions, role-plays, group activities and cooperative games.

Character Development Overview

Physical Education Department Overview

The mission of the HHP Physical Education Department is to help all students enjoy and learn about physical activity. The ultimate goal is so that students will continue to be active and healthy for the rest of their lives.

Objectives of the PE Department:

* Promote physical growth and development through activities that develop strength, skill, coordination, and cardio-vascular endurance

* Develop healthy and positive relationships with others

* Develop useful skills in physical activities that will be used throughout life

Classroom Expectations:

* Always be respectful to/of others

* Follow rules/code of good sportsmanship

* Be a willing participant

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