2017-18 Curriculum Guide

English Department

Overview

All English courses at Hilton Head Prep foster a love and respect for the English language and literature. The courses aim to develop students' critical and creative thinking, researching, reading, and speaking abilities. Through the study of great literature, we help students develop their own voices as writers and speakers, becoming careful, confident and effective communicators. Our curriculum is designed to expose students to important works of the English language and to create an awareness of traditions from other cultures and times. At the heart of our literary selections is the attempt to balance the need to read both canonical works and contemporary pieces. At every level our courses include instruction and assessment in vocabulary, grammar, analysis, research, critical reading, sound inference making and other skills assessed by the College Board.

The mission of the HHP Department of English is to foster the development of a community of student and faculty writers and scholars. The English department seeks to educate that community through scholarship and rigorous writing activities culminating in collegiate level work. The purpose of this community is threefold:

  • to support the acquisition of skills for understanding the language itself,
  • to guide the development of its use as a means of communication, and
  • to encourage an appreciation of its artistry as expressed in literature.

Fundamentals of Writing - 9 (Honors Available)

Fundamentals of Writing is an intensive writing course required of all freshmen. Students continue to build on the more basic building-blocks of reading and writing taught in middle school while also developing a more analytical approach to reading and writing. In class discussions, students share their ideas and develop ways to decipher the more complex readings, which range from the traditional to the contemporary. Students produce frequent reader response writings and in-class essays to extend the class discussions on paper and to allow them to be more comfortable thinking independently. The course emphasizes vocabulary and grammar as tools that further written and verbal communication. The course improves research skills culminating in a research paper that is an extension of the numerous smaller writing assignments students have completed throughout the year.

Grade level: 9

Duration: Full year

World Literature - 10 (Honors Available)

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 10

Description: World Literature places a strong focus on reading comprehension, effective inference making, critical thinking, and composition. The writing instruction will build on analytical, grammatical, and stylistic skills established in grade 9. The literature is modern and contemporary and will represent many countries and cultures. In addition to promoting close reading abilities and structural analysis the works selected are thematically linked and are intended to generate discussion about a core set of questions. How do technology, thought, and language interact? What are the consequences of urbanization, industrialization, and globalization? What does modern art including literature show us about how identity is challenged and problematized by events during modernity? This course also emphasizes vocabulary and grammar as tools that further written and spoken communication. Students will participate in individual and group oral presentations. The class culminates in a major research paper.

AP Language and Composition -11 and 12

AP Language & Composition is an intensive, college-level, analytical reading and writing course aiming to improve students' understanding and use of rhetoric. By engaging with various texts including fiction and nonfiction works, students are given models by which to hone their rhetorical and analytical skills. In this course, students become aware of the deliberate interactions among a writer's purposes, his/her audience expectations, and selection of subject material (the "rhetorical triangle"). Additionally, they become able to identify the ways in which authors employ generic conventions and all the resources of language to create memorable and effective prose.The study and acquisition of vocabulary is rigorous as students expand their awareness of the nuance and connotations of words, while also learning a vast amount of rhetorical and linguistic jargon. Current events and literacy of social issues are also stressed. There is a major end of the year research paper. The focus of this course culminates in the AP Language & Composition exam given in May of each year.

Grades: 11 and 12

Duration: Full year

AP Literature and Composition - 12

AP Literature and Composition is an intensive, college-level reading and writing course that presents a distinctive level of challenge through readings as recommended by the College Board. The pace is accelerated and copious, student-centered independent work further identifies this course. Assigned readings represent all the key genres: novels, short stories, plays, essays, and poetry. Vocabulary work includes both a traditional workbook and contextual study. There are frequent and demanding timed writing assignments and revisions. AP Lit students will prepare a research paper that requires extensive engagement with literary criticism. Students will develop high-level synthesis skills as they investigate, evaluate and apply different theoretical approaches to reading and writing about literature. Students will build upon their existing abilities in public speaking, discussion and academic discourse as they push each other in their interpretation and analysis.The focus of this course culminates in the AP Literature & Composition exam given in May of each year.

Grade level: 12

Duration: Full year

American Literature (Honors Available)

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 11

Description: American Literature focuses specifically on the key works which define “American literature” as uniquely American. Along with the works and authors themselves, students will study the important events of American history which shaped its literature. The study of American Literature has a secure, necessary foundation in the events and emotions which color our history. Readings in American Literature will follow chronologically those specific events which helped shape that history and will be taken from all the major genres: poetry, short stories, novels, drama, songs and chants, and informal essays. There is a culminating end of course research paper.

British Literature (Honors Available)

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 12

Description: British Literature explores works from the Anglo-Saxon period through modern times, focusing on the development of the English language and the progression of British literary and social movements. The primary goal of the course is to further develop students’ abilities in close reading, critical thinking, sophisticated writing, and cultural understanding. To that end, students will read and analyze literature from all major genres including poems, short stories, novels, plays, films, and essays. Through class discussions, varied writing assignments, and individual research, students will make connections among authors, periods, settings, and themes. There is a culminating end of course research paper.

Intensive English

Composition I

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Various types of composition such as personal narratives, descriptive essays, and expository essays are introduced as fundamentals of writing are emphasized. Students learn grammatical structures and formal rules of English grammar, as well as writing structure and mechanics.

Literature I

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Reading comprehension skills, critical thinking skills, and vocabulary building are taught while special attention is given to recognizing the main idea and supporting details. In addition, students also learn elements of fiction, biographies, autobiographies and nonfiction.

History I

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Through geography and ancient world history students continue to develop reading skills, writing skills, and vocabulary. Students also learn research methods in order to prepare for mainstream history courses.

History II

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Through the content of American History (the American Revolution, Civil War, WWI, and WWII), students continue to develop reading skills, writing skills, and vocabulary. Students also learn research methods in order to prepare for mainstream history courses.

Integrated Science I/II

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Through the content of physical, life, and earth science reading comprehension skills are learned and new vocabulary is understood. Students use note-taking skills and graphic organizers to learn science content and students perform various hands on science activities.

Composition II/III

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Various types of composition such as personal narratives, descriptive essays, expository essays, and persuasive essays are introduced as fundamentals of writing are emphasized. Students learn grammatical structures and formal rules of English grammar, as well as writing structure and mechanics. Writing prompts for TOEFL are introduced and writing as a process is emphasized.

Literature II/III

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10 or 11

Description: Reading comprehension skills, critical thinking skills, and vocabulary building are taught while special attention is given to recognizing the main idea and supporting details. In addition, students also learn elements of fiction, biographies, autobiographies and nonfiction.

Intensive English Seminar

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11 or 12

Description: In this supplemental course, support is provided for Intensive English students who are in the mainstream English classroom. It provides extra emphasis on critical thinking skills, reading comprehension skills, and writing skills.

World Languages Department

Overview

The World Language department seeks to develop the fundamental skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, with the aim of guiding students towards proficiency in a second language, insight and appreciation of a culture other than their own and confidence in their linguistic abilities. Students engage in an active learning environment to build their vocabulary in the target language and attain a strong understanding of grammatical structures, while communicative teaching methods encourage them to experience the language of study viscerally and to continue learning outside of the classroom. Advanced students read, analyze, and discuss literary works, follow current events and delve into greater historical and cultural study to continue to develop communicative competence and engage in intensive practice of all language skills.

The study of Spanish is introduced in Junior Kindergarten. Upon entering the Upper School, students choose between continuation of their Spanish studies and Chinese 1. Placement of transferring students will be done by evaluating previous experience in the language and may include a test and/or interview.

Spanish I (Honors Available) - 9 and 10 (11 by department discretion)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 9 and 10 (11 by department discretion)

Description: Spanish 1 is an introduction to the Spanish language and Hispanic culture. The course focuses on the development of the three modes of communication (interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational) through the acquisition of contextually appropriate vocabulary and basic grammatical concepts. The course helps to develop confidence in communication and an appreciation of Spanish-speaking cultures around the world. Students will be asked to demonstrate their knowledge of the language and culture through a variety of performance-based tasks with the goal of communication in the target language at a novice level.

Spanish II (Honors Available) - 10, 11, and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 10, 11, and 12

Description: Spanish 2 builds on Spanish 1 material, allowing students to begin to express themselves more fully in the target language using the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Existing vocabulary and grammatical concepts are strengthened while new ones are introduced and practiced through in and out-of-class activities. Hispanic cultural topics will continue to be addressed with relevant performance-based tasks and assessments.

Spanish III - (Honors Available) 10, 11, and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 10, 11, and 12

Description: Spanish 3 builds on Spanish 1 and 2 material, enabling students to begin to more independently express themselves in the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Students will use a widening variety of performance-based tasks and assessments in order to showcase their growing knowledge and understanding of the target language. Advanced vocabulary and grammar topics will be accompanied with numerous authentic texts, allowing the students to engage with the Spanish language and associated cultures.

Spanish IV (Honors Available) - 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Description: Spanish 4 is an instructor-approved, elective course that strengthens students’ skills and knowledge acquired in levels 1-3 in order to communicate at a higher level while preparing students for the grammatical rigors of the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and/or the Advanced Placement Spanish Literature courses. All topics covered will be culturally and contextually relevant, offering greater insight into Peninsular Spanish and Latin American civilizations and their significance to past, present, and potential future fields of study. All assessments will adhere to the development of the three communicative modes: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Additionally the course will provide further opportunities for each student to interact with the literature, cultures, history, and contemporary life of many Spanish-speaking countries. Themes from the AP tracks will be addressed.


AP Spanish Language and Culture - 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Description: : Comparable to an advanced college language course, AP Spanish Language and Culture teaches students how to engage in conversations and present formal oral presentations, write in both interpersonal and presentational settings, and correctly interpret authentic audio sources. The course will focus on equipping the students with skills to enable them to perform meaningful language functions. They will also develop significant cultural awareness and applicable knowledge while simultaneously preparing for the performance-based AP assessment that has potential to earn college-level credit.

Chinese I (Honors Available) - 9 and 10 (11 by department discretion)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 9 and 10 (11 by department discretion)

Description: Chinese 1 is an introduction to the Chinese language and culture. Students will learn functional Chinese, theme-based vocabulary words, and will become familiar with the sound system through the study of pinyin (western alphabet) and language structures. Students will explore, compare, and contrast various cultural topics. The emphasis will be on speaking skills training. After a successful completion of this course, students will reach Novice Mid in Chinese by ACTFL standards.

Chinese II (Honors Available) - 10, 11, and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 10, 11, and 12

Description: Chinese 2 builds on Chinese 1 material. Students will continue to learn functional Chinese and use theme-based vocabulary words built on Chinese 1. Students will explore, compare, and contrast various cultural topics and develop their four language skills—reading, writing, speaking, listening—through three modes: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The emphasis will be on speaking skills training. After a successful completion of this course, students will reach Novice High in Chinese by ACTFL standards.

Chinese III (Honors Available) - 10, 11, and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 10, 11, and 12

Description: Chinese 3 builds on Chinese 1 and 2 material. Students will learn more complicated functional Chinese and theme-based vocabulary words built on Chinese 1 and 2. Students will explore, compare, and contrast various cultural topics. Students will further develop their four language skills—reading, writing, speaking, listening -by using three modes: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. After a successful completion of this course, students will reach Intermediate Low in Chinese by ACTFL standards.

Chinese IV (Honors Available) - 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Description: Chinese 4 is an instructor-approved, elective course that strengthens students’ skills and knowledge acquired in levels 1-3. Students will learn more complicated functional Chinese and theme-based vocabulary words. Expanding vocabulary and mastering important but difficult words and phrases become the primary goals. Students will explore, compare, and contrast various cultural topics. The emphasis will be on reading and writing skills training. After a successful completion of this course, students will reach Intermediate High in Chinese by ACTFL standards.

Chinese V

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 with departmental permission)

Description: Chinese V is comparable to an advanced college language course. Students will learn not only functional Chinese, but also more intellectually and linguistically challenging topics. The course will present more authentic material that will engage learners. The emphasis will be on reading and writing skills training. After a successful completion of this course, students will reach Advanced Mid in Chinese by ACTFL standards.

American Sign Language

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11 or 12

Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to begin to acquire proficiency in American Sign Language through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach. Emphasis is placed on the development of receptive and expressive signing skills and on the acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. An exposure to Deaf Culture will be presented, and students will learn about the history of Deaf education, American Sign Language, and important Deaf Americans.

Social Sciences Department

Overview

The mission of the Department of Social Sciences is to foster the creation of a community of learners who possess a body of knowledge about human history and are able to find and evaluate information, make reasoned decisions, and effectively communicate in our interconnected world.

Western Civilization - 9 (Honors Available)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 9 (10, 11, and 12 by instructor permission)

Description: Western Civilization is a survey course that allows students to study the major people, places and events of world history through thematic units. Students will be asked to examine beliefs and biases in order to better comprehend a range of perspectives on seminal issues that have arisen over time. This is a Project-Based Learning (PBL) course that balances development of traditional academic skills such as formal note-taking and short-essay writing with skills in designing and executing information technology projects such as wikis, podcasts, and map overlays. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation, evaluation, and analysis of sources, questions, issues, and events. Completion of this course is preparatory for more advanced work in AP European History.

American Studies - 10 (Honors Available)

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 10 (11 and 12 by instructor permission)

Description: American Studies is a survey of the political, social, cultural, and economic themes that have developed in American society from the American Revolution through the present day. This is a Project-Based Learning (PBL) course that balances development of traditional academic skills such as formal note-taking and short-essay writing with skills in designing and executing information technology projects such as wikis, podcasts, and map overlays. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation, evaluation, and analysis of sources, questions, issues, and events. Completion of this course is preparatory for more advanced work in AP United States History and AP United States Government and Politics.

AP United States History - 11 and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Description: AP United States History is intended as an introductory college-level survey course of American History from the Age of Exploration through the modern day. Primarily, course materials are intended to hone students' analytical and critical thinking skills as well as prompt them to make connections between seemingly disparate concepts or periods in American history. Students will analyze major political, economic, and military events during the last five centuries of American history, as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual movements that precipitated, or were inspired by, those events. Emphasis will be placed on preparing for the national AP exam in May; written facets of that exam, including document-based and free response essays, comprise a major element of in-class examinations.

AP European History - 11 and 12 *

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12 (10 by instructor permission)

Description: AP European History is intended as an introductory college-level survey course of European History from the Late Middle Ages through the modern day. Primarily, course materials are intended to hone students' analytical and critical thinking skills as well as prompt them to make connections between seemingly disparate concepts or periods in European history. Students will analyze major political, economic, and military events during the last six centuries of European history, as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual movements that precipitated, or were inspired by, those events. Emphasis will be placed on preparing for the national AP exam in May; written facets of that exam, including document-based and free response essays, comprise a major element of in-class examinations.

American Politics and Society (Honors Available) - 11 and 12

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12

Description: This two-part course explores American politics and society across two semesters. In the fall semester, we will closely follow the progress of the 2016 General Election, with particular focus on the race for the White House and for control of Congress. Students will be required to research the candidates and their issues, and all students 18-years old on election day will be encouraged to vote. In the spring semester, we will undertake readings in contemporary political ideas while following the first hundred days of the new presidency.

Economics (Honors Available) - 11 and 12

Duration: 1 semester

Grade Level(s): 11 and 12

Description: This course will give the students a greater understanding of economics ranging from the viewpoint of the individual consumer or small business owner to the global economy. The course will study the law of supply and demand, forms of business, labor unions, government finances and influence on the economy, money and prices, inflation and deflation cycles. The course relates history and politics to the study of economics. (Borrowed from Central Community Unit School District 4)

Ethics (Honors Available) - 11 and 12

Duration: 1 semester

Grade Level (s): 11 and 12

Description: Ethics is an introduction course to the philosophical study of morality, including the theory of right and wrong behavior, the theory of value (goodness and badness), and the theory of virtue and vice. Students will understand and apply different approaches to ethical thinking and identify advantages and limitations of ethical theories like utilitarianism, virtue ethics, deontology, and situation ethics. Besides providing familiarity with the primary questions addressed within moral philosophy and the most influential answers given by well-known philosophers, this course is designed to help students develop their abilities to read, explicate, analyze, and evaluate ethical case studies, write and express themselves well about their own ethical positions, and think critically and analytically about ethical issues. The class will also explore biomedical ethics, legal ethics, business ethics, and neuroscience research on morality.

AP World History

Can be taken in place of Western Civilization with teacher recommendation and parent approval. A meeting with the Social Science Department Head is required prior to registering for this course.

Duration: 1 year

Grade Level(s): 9 (10, 11, and 12 by instructor permission)

Description: AP World History is a rigorous, college-level course designed to explore human history from 8000 B.C.E. to the present. We will emphasize the development of analytical and writing skills necessary for success on a collegiate level. To this end, the course devotes considerable time to the critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources, analysis of historiography (The principles, theories, or methodology of scholarly historical research and presentation) and inquiry into global connections that have shaped our present world. A special emphasis will be given to preparation for the National AP Exam, including historical writing through essay and document-based questions (DBQ) as well as objective evaluations. All students are required to take the AP exam in May.

Mathematics Department

Overview

The Mathematics Department believes that mathematics is an essential skill for students. The department is devoted to developing critically minded students who will be prepared to use mathematical concepts. The curriculum is central in the process of making certain our students are prepared for and successful in their future education at the college level. The curriculum stresses conceptual understanding as well as problem solving skills and the use of technology to equip our students to reason and communicate effectively. The teachers in the math department are committed to meeting the needs of the individual student and providing the tools necessary for all students to meet their potential.

Algebra I

Grades: 9

Description: Algebra I is designed to provide the foundation for more advanced mathematics courses and to develop problem-solving skills. Topics include, but are not limited to, the real number system, first-degree equations and inequalities, relations, functions, graphs, systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, integral exponents, rational and radical expressions, quadratic equations, and year-long work in problem solving.

Geometry

Grade: 9 or 10

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Description: This course is designed to foster development in deductive thinking skills utilizing geometric proofs as a vehicle. Topics include, but are not limited to, logic and reasoning, Euclidean geometry of lines, planes, angles, triangles, similarity, congruence, geometric inequalities, polygons, circles, and geometric constructions.

Geometry Honors

Grades: 9 or 10

Prerequisite: Algebra I with teacher recommendation

Description: The purpose of this course is to give a rigorous, in-depth study of geometry with emphasis on methods of proof and the formal language of mathematics. Topics include, but are not limited to, Euclidean geometry and history, separation properties, angle concepts, triangles, quadrilaterals, proofs, perpendicularity and parallelism in a plane and in space, similar polygons, circles and spheres, constructions, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry.

Algebra II

Grades: 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Description: This course is designed to continue the work of Algebra I. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the real number system, relations, functions, graphs, polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations and inequalities, linear algebra, conic sections, rational and irrational exponents, logarithms and exponential equations and complex numbers.

Algebra II Honors

Grades: 9, 10

Prerequisite: Algebra I with teacher recommendation

Description: This course is designed to continue the work of Algebra I. In addition to the Algebra II topics, included are number theory, history and problems of algebra, advanced linear algebra, trigonometry, and problem solving techniques.

Precalculus

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II

Description: The first portion of this course is dedicated to the study of Trigonometry followed by a more rigorous study of Algebra II topics. Additionally, concepts of discrete mathematics will be introduced.

Precalculus Honors

Grades: 10, 11

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II with teacher recommendation

Description: The first portion of this course is dedicated to the study of Trigonometry, with an emphasis on proofs, followed by a more rigorous study of Algebra II topics. Additionally, concepts of discrete mathematics will be introduced. This is a very demanding course in preparation for AP Calculus.

Calculus Honors

Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisite: Precalculus with teacher recommendation

Description: This course is designed to provide a basis for developing further study of more advanced mathematics. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the study of limits, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and their applications. Students exiting this course will be well prepared for a college calculus course.

AP Calculus AB

Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisite: Precalculus Honors with teacher recommendation

Description: This course is designed as a college Calculus course. All topics required by the College Board will be extensively covered. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the year.

AP Calculus BC

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB with teacher recommendation

Description: AP Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB; common topics require a similar depth of understanding. The curriculum for AP Calculus BC is equivalent to a first-semester college calculus course plus the subsequent single-variable calculus course. This course is intended to be challenging and demanding. All students are required to take the AP exam in May.

Statistics

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Description: In this course, students will explore data, examine relationships, and make inferential decisions. Upon completion of this course, students will have a strong background in statistical concepts to be well prepared for a college level Statistics course.

AP Statistics

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Precalculus with teacher recommendation

Description: This course is designed as a college Statistics course. All topics required by the College Board will be extensively covered. These topics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the year.

Algebra III / Trigonometry

Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II

Description: This course is designed to prepare students for College Algebra. Topics will include, but are not limited to: solving and graphing equations and inequalities, systems of equations, matrices and determinants, logarithmic and exponential functions, as well as analytic and triangle trigonometry.

Science Department

Overview

The science department strives to instill in our students a love of understanding of all sciences, with a special emphasis on the interconnection between these sciences and the unique ecosystems that surround our campus. Our students participate in hands-on learning experiences and they are given the tools to interpret these lessons and develop critical thinking skills. Using local topics as a spring board students are encouraged to apply their problem solving skills to issues pertinent to our global community. When a student graduates from Hilton Head Preparatory School we hope they continue to be curious and develop a quest for lifelong learning. Our primary hope is to create a scientifically literate global citizen.

College Prep Biology - 9 (Honors Available)

Grade: 9

Description: Biology is the study of living things. The focus of the course is to explore the biological sciences from the molecular level to the various levels of complexity of living things including differences in life forms and functions while emphasizing ecological interactions. This course details the understanding of biological concepts while emphasizing the scientific thought process. By using classroom lecture and laboratory experiences as a foundation, the student will then exercise critical thinking skills with the use of presentations, essays, and projects.

College Prep Chemistry - 10

Grade: 10

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Biology, concurrent enrollment in Geometry

Description: Chemistry students will explore such topics as properties and changes of matter, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, periodicity, formation and types of compounds, chemical reactions and equations, chemical bonding, the kinetic theory, gases, stoichometry, solutions, and acids and bases. Abstract reasoning and mathematical skills are emphasized. Hands-on laboratory experiences reinforce theory while preparing students to become environmentally conscious citizens.

College Prep Physics - 11 or 12

Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology & Chemistry. Recommended to have completed Algebra II

Description: Physics will teach students how to make observations about the world around them and then hopefully become curious and want to know why. The course will help the student learn the means by which information is collected, interpreted and how one formulates hypotheses and makes further predictions to achieve knowledge of facts, principles and processes of the physical universe. Main topics cover the study of motion, mechanical physics, and some relativity [an attempt to explain some of Einstein's projections]. In addition, the scientific method is emphasized through the completion of a science fair project.

Chemistry Honors - 9

Grade: 9

Prerequisites: Grades of 90 or higher in Geometry and Biology, concurrent enrollment in Geometry, Science Department Recommendation

Description: Chemistry Honors is a demanding, fast-paced, lab oriented course. It is designed to challenge the science oriented student and prepare that student for the rigors associated with AP Bio and AP Chemistry. In addition to the topics covered in the college prep chemistry course, honors students will study redox reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and the energy associated with chemical reactions. Laboratory experience is essential to the Honors Chemistry Program.

AP Chemistry - 11

Grade: 11

Prerequisites: PSAT score of 61 or better. Successful completion of Biology Honors & Chemistry Honors with grade of 90 or higher, Concurrent enrollment in Calculus (highly recommended), Science Department Recommendation

Description: This course is designed to the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as college freshman, second year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry was a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. Laboratory experience is essential to the AP Chemistry Program. Topics of study are divided into the following five areas: structure of matter, states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, and laboratory. Students are encouraged to take the SAT 2 Chemistry Exam at conclusion of this course.

AP Biology - 10

Grade: 10

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry Honors with grade of 90 or higher, Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2, Science Department Recommendation

Description:The AP Biology course is designed for students who have a sincere desire to accept the responsibility of college level work. Students are expected to prepare for and take the AP Biology Exam in May. Course work is advanced, and class lectures and experiments cover such topics as biochemistry, cell physiology, evolution, ecology, animal physiology, animal behavior, plant physiology, inheritance, and molecular biology. Hopefully, students will develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing information explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging.

AP Physics I

The Arts program strives to enhance appreciation for the arts through experience. Whether singing, creating a painting, a character, or studying aside working practitioners, students not only become tomorrow's artists but tomorrow's arts advocates as well. Through active participation, students at all grade levels gain true appreciation for artistic excellence in all of its forms.

The Hilton Head Preparatory artist takes form through a wide range of opportunities within our Fine Arts Department. Challenged and mentored by talented and experienced artist-teachers, students are encouraged to embrace their creative energies through a variety of artistic interpretations and media.

The Performing Arts Department exposes the student to many aspects of theatre, music, and film. Students take part in two major theatrical productions a year, video acting projects, concerts and musical theatre showcases. Performing Ensembles include: Prep Singers, Singing Dolphins and Prep Performing Arts Theatre Ensemble.

The Visual Arts Department consistently wins awards in regional, state and national competitions. Recently added to our offerings is the rapidly growing photography program.

Music offerings include opportunities for chorus, vocal and instrumental soloists, instrumental ensembles and instruction in piano and string instruments.

At Prep, students can discover a love and aptitude for the arts as well as prepare for their next level of study.

Grade: 12

Prerequisites: PSAT score of 61 or better. Successful completion of Biology Honors & Chemistry Honors with grade of 90 or higher. Successful completion of Calculus (highly recommended). Science Department Recommendation

Description: The Physics B course includes topics in both classical and modern physics. Knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required for the course. Understanding the basic principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems is the major goal of this course. The Physics B course seeks to be representative of topics covered in similar college courses. Topics are divided into the following six categories: Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic nuclear physics, and laboratory. Laboratory experience is essential to the AP Physics Program.

Marine Biology - 11 or 12

Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry

Description: Taking advantage of the ecological location of our school, the course will investigate physical, ecological, and biological concepts of ocean, estuary, and intertidal communities. The course primarily emphasizes hands-on experiences, student driven investigation and journaling, and community outreach.

Physiology - 11 or 12

Grade(s): 11 or 12

Description: Anatomy and Physiology will provide students with a lab based approach to examine the form and function of complex organisms. This course will focus on the human body, but will also include multiple dissections of other mammals to aid students in their understanding of human body systems. Anatomy and Physiology is an elective recommended for students interested in a health related career path. Students interested in this course should expect an academically rigorous approach to understanding all 12 organ systems of the human body and the underlying biochemistry that enables their function. Successful completion of one high school biology and one high school chemistry class are prerequisites to enrollment.

Other Required Courses/Credits

Freshman Seminar

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 9

Other: Pass/Fail, ¼ credit

Description: Freshman Seminar is a uniquely designed course intended to ensure a successful transition from middle school to our college-prep high school. All freshman will meet in their seminar classes 1x week for a full year. This seminar class serves many purposes, but most importantly it helps develop personal relationships with the college counseling staff as well as other counseling and academic professionals in the school. Topics covered include: Personality and Learning Styles, Study and Organizational Skills, Career/College Major Exploration, College Readiness, Early College Planning, and College Expectations, Service Learning/Community Service, Health and Wellness, and Logic and Critical Reasoning.

Sophomore Seminar

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 10

Other: Pass/Fail, ¼ credit

Description: Sophomore Seminar a course designed to support the students’ social, emotional and academic needs. The students will experience a comprehensive health curriculum as well as college preparatory guidance. All sophomores will meet in their seminar classes 1x week for a full year.

Topics covered include: Emotional Wellness, Social Wellness, Diet and Nutrition, Drugs/Alcohol, College Readiness, Early College Planning, and College Expectations, Service Learning/Community Service, and Logic and Critical Reasoning.

Junior Seminar

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 11

Other: Pass/Fail, ½ credit

Description: Junior Seminar is designed to prepare students for the college application process.

In the fall, juniors will attend seminar class 2-3x a week. Students will be preparing for the ACT and SAT tests. The course is divided into two learning modules. One module is textbook based, the other is online learning. Students will be given test content instruction as well as test taking strategies. Their progress will be monitored and individual learning plans will be developed for each child so that they can reach their full potential.

In the spring, juniors will meet in Junior Seminar 1 or 2x a month to begin their college application process. They will continue to work on finalizing their college lists, request letters of recommendations from teachers, develop a standardized testing plan, begin their college essays and begin their Common Application.

Senior Seminar

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level: 12

Other: Pass/Fail, 0 credit

Description: Senior Seminar is designed to prepare students for the completion of college application process.

In the fall, seniors will attend seminar class 1x a week. Students will be working individually with their college counselor on their applications, essays, resumes and teacher letter of recommendations. All applications are due in the counseling office by December 1.

In the spring, seniors will meet in Senior Seminar 1 or 2x a month, participating in our “Getting Ready for College” workshop series. These workshops are taught by HHP faculty and or community professionals. Topics include, but are not limited to: Finance and Budgeting, Campus Safety, Developing and Maintaining Healthy Relationships and Organization and Study Skills.

Other Elective Courses

Introduction to Programming (linked to Web Design and Graphic Design)

Duration: 1 Semester

Grade Level(s): 10, 11, 12

Description: This introductory course will allow students to experience a variety of coding languages and applications. This course is largely student-driven. The semester begins with a JavaScript tutorial, culminating in a simple project to demonstrate this newfound knowledge. Every subsequent language studied is chosen by the student, and projects are assigned for each language. The final exam will consist of a larger, self-guided project which shows the student’s development over the course of the semester.

Cadet Teaching

Duration: Semester or Full Year

Grade Level(s): Grades 11 or 12 with teacher recommendation

Description: Cadet Teaching seeks to allow participants to gain a deeper understanding of the educational process, to develop and demonstrate good leadership qualities in and out of the classroom, and to reflect on individual self-growth and progress. Students will be exposed to lesson design, teaching, assessment, and other processes associated with academic instruction, as well as encouraged to build good rapport with student members of the course within which they are cadet teachers. This course can be taken as an instructor-approved elective on a pass or fail basis, for any junior or senior student interested in serving as a cadet teacher alongside an upper school faculty member for the academic year (1 credit) or for the academic semester (½ credit) . Students must have an available space in their schedule (in other words, a FREE PERIOD) in order to apply for acceptance to the program and placement is not guaranteed. Permission must be obtained from the desired course instructor, the program coordinator, and the Upper School Division Head in order to finalize the application process and move towards a final placement in the course. To remain eligible for enrollment as a cadet teacher, all accepted students must maintain a “C” average or above with NO failing grade in all enrolled classes at Prep. Students must also commit to weekly journaling or self-reflection, which will be reviewed through weekly or bi-monthly meetings with the sponsoring instructor. This course will be assigned outside of the course registration process.

Enhanced Diploma Opportunities

Overview

AP Capstone™ is an innovative diploma program from the College Board that equips students with the independent research, collaborative teamwork, and communication skills that are increasingly valued by colleges. AP Capstone is built on the foundation of two AP courses — AP Seminar and AP Research — and is designed to complement and enhance the in-depth, discipline-specific study experienced in other AP courses. In AP Seminar, students investigate real-world issues from multiple perspectives, gathering and analyzing information from various sources in order to develop credible and valid evidence-based arguments. In AP Research, students cultivate the skills and discipline necessary to conduct independent research in order to produce and defend a scholarly academic paper. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and

AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of their choosing will receive the AP Capstone Diploma. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research but not on four additional AP Exams will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate. AP Seminar may also be taken as a stand-alone option.

AP Capstone - Seminar 1st Year

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level(s): 11, 12

Description: AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

AP Capstone - Research 2nd Year

Course will be available to Senior during the 2018-19 School Year.

Duration: 1 Year

Grade Level(s): 12

Prerequisite: AP Capstone Seminar

Description: Although the topic of each research study will vary, the course requires students to plan and conduct a study or investigation. The course provides opportunities (activities/assignments) for students to

  • Understand principles of discipline-specific research methods (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, mixed)
  • Employ appropriate disciplinary research methods to develop, manage, and conduct an in-depth study or investigation in an area of student’s own interest, culminating in a 4000–5000 word paper (accompanied by an additional piece of scholarly work — where applicable — to be performed or exhibited).
  • Present (using appropriate media) and defend the research design, approach, and findings to a panel.
  • Document their processes and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio.
  • Certificate of Excellence

    The Certificate of Excellence program allows exceptional and motivated seniors to have a one year capstone experience designing, developing, and executing both a major service initiative and a sustained inquiry or research project. As the culmination of their experience and in fulfillment of a final requirement students earning a Certificate of Excellence must give a formal presentation and defense of their work.

    Diploma of Distinction

    The Diploma of Distinction provides an intensive two year course of study and capstone experience for gifted, motivated, curious, and self-reflective students. Candidates for this diploma design, develop, and executing both an innovative and significant service initiative and a sustained inquiry or research project. In addition, candidates work closely in independent study and directed readings with a faculty advisors, explore opportunities for internships and outside the classroom learning, and take interdisciplinary seminar classes in research methods, theory of knowledge, and creative problem solving. As the culmination of their experience and in fulfillment of a final requirement students earning a Certificate of Excellence must give a formal presentation and defense of their work.

    The Fine Arts Department

    Overview

    The Fine Arts program strives to enhance appreciation for the arts through experience. Whether singing, creating a painting, a character, or studying aside working practitioners, students not only become tomorrow's artists but tomorrow's arts advocates as well. Through active participation, students at all grade levels gain true appreciation for artistic excellence in all of its forms.

    The Hilton Head Preparatory artist takes form through a wide range of opportunities within our Fine Arts Department. Challenged and mentored by talented and experienced artist-teachers, students are encouraged to embrace their creative energies through a variety of artistic interpretations and media.

    The Performing Arts Department exposes the student to many aspects of theatre, music, and film. Students take part in two major theatrical productions a year; improve style performances, concerts and musical theatre showcases. Performing Ensembles include: Prep Orchestra, Lower School Advanced Strings, Prep Singers, and Prep Performing Arts Theatre Ensemble.

    The Visual Arts Department consistently wins awards in regional, state and national competitions. Recently added to our offerings are the rapidly growing photography, ceramics and web design programs.

    Music offerings include opportunities for chorus, vocal and instrumental soloists, instrumental ensembles and instruction in piano and string instruments.

    At Prep, students can discover a love and aptitude for the arts as well as prepare for their next level of study.

    Performing Arts

    Advanced Scene Study & Directing- (2nd Semester)

    Advanced scene study digs deeper into creating more believable, focused and truthful onstage relationships. By working on multiple scenes during the semester, students learn how to make committed choices in a relatively short period of time. There will also be the opportunity to apply this knowledge in student directed works while learning the nuts & bolts of bringing a piece from an initial idea to a fully realized production.Admission by approval of instructor. Maximum Capacity (8-10)

    Writing and Directing for the Stage

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level(s) Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12 (Previous Theatre experience preferred.)

    Description: Let's make art happen. In Writing and Directing for the Stage you will have the opportunity to explore the world of theatre through in-depth analysis of theatrical works. During the first semester, students will read and stage scenes from contemporary and classic plays. The second semester will be devoted to writing, work shopping, and staging their own plays. At the end of the year there will be a showcase of student works.

    Music

    Upper School Orchestra

    Open to all strings players by audition or past experience at Prep. Students will participate in all school concerts, recitals, music festivals and competitions.

    Upper School Studio Lesson

    Private violin, viola, cello or bass lesson. Open to students of any level. This is a private lesson and meets once a week for a full period. Instrument (ownership or rental) is required. Music will be provided.

    Band

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level(s): Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12

    Description:Beginning Band is the first full year of music instruction on their instruments. Ownership or rental of instruments is encouraged. This beginning band class develops skills on a variety of woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Emphasis is given to providing a strong fundamental approach to their instrument. Rehearsal from the required Music Text will be accomplished daily, as well as developmental music theory. Performance outside of normal school hours are required as part of this course.

    Commercial Music

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level(s): Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12

    Description: Do you love to sing and write your own music? Have you ever dreamed of becoming a professional performer? This new course emphasizes both performing and learning about the music industry. Join Prep’s newest singing group! Students will identify their vocal range and tempo of voice. They will also learn the foundation of reading and interpreting music---as well as writing. Professional Musicians will interact with students providing an authentic glimpse into this exciting field.

    Visual Arts

    Art I

    The goal of Art I is to cultivate visual literacy, technical experience, sensitivity and artistic expression through assignments in a variety of media. All projects are explored through the elements and principles of design.

    The major projects of the first semester are:

    -Abstract “Analog” in Colored Ink (Pointillism)

    -Value Painting in Acrylic (Black, White, Light Grey, Dark Grey)

    -Traditional Self Portrait in Graphite


    Art II

    The goal of Art II is to broaden your visual literacy, technical experience, sensitivity and artistic expression through assignments in a variety of media. All projects are explored through the elements and principles of design.

    The major projects of the first semester are:

    Abstract “Analog” in Pen and Ink
    Color Value Painting in Acrylic
    Traditional Self Portrait in Black and White Colored Pencil on Gray Paper

    Art III

    This course is designed for non-A.P. bound students to continue their exploration of drawing and painting.

    Art III, Honors (by permission of the instructor)

    This course is for juniors who are working on an A.P. Studio Art portfolio over the course of two years.

    AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio (by permission of the instructor)

    Advanced Placement Studio Art is graded on the basis of a portfolio (rather than by exam, as in other A.P. courses). Every assignment is geared toward building the portfolio. The portfolio is made up of 3 sections:

    1. Section I, “Quality,” consists of five actual drawings that represent your absolute best work. (“Quality” refers to mastery of technique, concept and composition.) These drawings will be matted and mailed to the College Board for evaluation. They can be no larger than 18”x24” including the matte.

    2. Section II, “The Concentration” is a body of related drawings based on an individual’s interest in a particular visual concern. It focuses on a process of investigation, growth and discovery with any idea in any medium. In this section you may submit a maximum of 12 images.

    3. Section III represents the “breadth/variety” of your experience in drawing. This section consists of all non-concentration assignments (scratchboard, charcoal, oil and chalk pastels, etc.). These assignments will emphasize drawing from life (observation) as well as abstract, non-objective and invented compositions. All section III assignments will emphasize the elements and principles of design. This section contains 12 images.

    Photography I

    In this digital photography course, emphasis will be on using the photographic image to make a significant visual statement. Project work will be guided towards producing expressive and meaningful, well-composed images that are technically sound. Class time is dedicated to in-depth discussion of historical and contemporary photographers, demonstrations on technique, and class critiques. The class will use digital cameras, Apple computers, IPhoto and Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom.

    Photography II

    This course is designed for students to continue their exploration of photography.

    AP 2-D Design: Photography (by permission of the instructor)

    Advanced Placement 2-D Design is graded on the basis of a portfolio (rather than by exam, as in other A.P. courses). Every assignment is geared toward building the portfolio. The portfolio is made up of 3 sections:

    1. Section I, “Quality,” consists of five actual photographs that represent your absolute best work. (“Quality” refers to mastery of technique, concept and composition.) These photographs will be matted and mailed to the College Board for evaluation. They can be no larger than 18”x24” including the matte.

    2. Section II, “The Concentration” is a body of related photographs based on an individual’s interest in a particular visual concern. It focuses on a process of investigation, growth and discovery. In this section you may submit a maximum of 12 images.

    3. Section III represents the “breadth/variety” of your experience in photography. This section consists of all non-concentration assignments. All section III assignments will emphasize the elements and principles of design. This section contains 12 images.

    Ceramics I

    In this introductory ceramics course, students will be exposed to basic hand building as well as wheel-thrown techniques. A variety of both utilitarian and non-utilitarian projects will be constructed.Students will also learn fundamental glazing and firing techniques.It is essential that class members comply with expectations regarding proper use, care and cleanup of all equipment and materials.

    Ceramics II

    A continuation of Ceramics I, Ceramics II involves study in greater depth of properties of clays and glazes as well as object design. Students will also assist Ceramics 1 students.

    Printmaking

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11 or 12

    Description: This class introduces students to the hands-on art of printmaking. Students will learn about the nuances of the printing press and learn various forms of prints, including, but not limited to, printing designs on shirts and doing engravings in metal plates. Come learn about this often-overlooked art form!

    Hand Building & Sculpture

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level(s): Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12

    Description: Hand building is offered to new students and second year students that are not interested in throwing on the pottery wheel. (Past students have found hand building to be a method of working with clay that is more diverse and creative than novice wheel throwing). Focusing on hand building will provide more time for unique forms and more creative surface designs. Sculpture will be hand building with Red Earthenware clay on forms, stands or armatures. These will also be glazed and fired.

    Technology

    Programming

    Duration: 1 Semester

    Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12

    Description: This course is designed to offer an introduction to computer science. Students will learn the along with the basics of computer programming and computer science. The material emphasizes computational thinking and helps develop the ability to solve complex problems. The primary language for the course is Python. This course will be taught in the format of a massive online open course (MOOC) and is designed for 18 weeks of instruction. The course will consist of video lectures, daily programming exercises, longer coding assignments, regular quizzes, projects and exams. Students will also participate in online discussion forums.

    No prerequisites.

    AP Computer Science

    Duration: 1 Year

    Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

    Description: This course is designed for students who are serious about Computer Programming. JAVA requires a good mathematical background and strong problem solving skills. Topics include simple, user defined and structured data types, algorithm development, decisions and loops, arrays, recursion, searches and sorts, data abstraction, and classes. This course will be taught in the format of a massive online open course (MOOC). The course will consist of video lectures, daily programming exercises, longer coding assignments, regular quizzes, projects and exams. Students will also participate in online discussion forums. Students will be required to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science Level A exam in May.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1, knowledge of functions and function notation. Previous computer programming is not necessary.

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